Geschlechterforschung / Gender Studies
print


Navigationspfad


Inhaltsbereich

Übung: Moving Europe: Gender, Race, Citizenship and Migration (FitzGerald, Ph.D.)

Mittwoch, 12.00 – 14.00 Uhr; Freitag, 12.00 – 14.00 Uhr, IfS, R. 108

This seminar introduces students at LMU to key themes in contemporary sociological and interdisciplinary scholarship on migration circuits. It will focus specifically on how the European Union (EU) understands and attempts to regulate migration from the developing world. This is a research-driven seminar stemming from Dr FitzGerald’s theoretical and empirical interest and experience in the field of feminist and socio-legal approach to migration. Using critical, feminist, intersectional, postcolonial and socio-legal theories, this seminar interrogates the tensions between migrants and states’ interpretations of immigration, illegality, the ‘right’ to mobility, across EU jurisdictions. In particular this seminar aims to develop an interdisciplinary and critical engagement with the role that the intersection of categories of gender, race, class, sexuality and ethnicity play in the EU’s various migration laws and policies. The seminar will introduce and encourage students to achieve a deep understanding of a series of ‘real life’ problems’ in law and policy in migration studies.
Literatur:
• Anderson, B, (2010), “Migration, Immigration Controls and the Fashioning of Precari-ous Workers," Work, Employment and Society, 24(2): 300-17.
• Askola H. (2007), Legal Responses to Trafficking in Women for Sexual Exploitation in the European Union (Oxford: Hart Publishing).
• Castles, S. and Miller M. J. (2009), The Age of Migration: International Population Mo-vements in the Modern World (New York: Palgrave). • Desforges, L. Jones, R and Woods, M. (2005), ‘New Geographies of Citizenship’ Citi-zenship Studies, 9: 5. 439-451. • FitzGerald, S. (2011) Regulating the International Movement of Women: From Protec-tion to Control. London: Routledge.
• Kofman, E. (2005), ‘Citizenship, Migration and the Reassertion of National Identity’, Citizenship Studies 9: 5, 453-467.
• Morokvasic, M. (2004), ‘ ‘Settled in Mobility’: Engendering Post Wall Migration in Europe’ Feminist Review 77: 7-25. • Sassen, S. (2002), ‘Women’s Burden: Counter-Geographies of Globalization and the Feminization of Survival’, Nordic Journal of International Law 71, 255-274.
• Yeoh, B, and Huang, S. (1999), ‘Spaces and Margins: Migrant Domestic Workers and the Development of Civil Society in Singapore’, Environment and Planning A 31: 7, 1149-1167.